Defining the temporal evolution of gut dysbiosis and inflammatory responses leading to hepatocellular carcinoma in Mdr2 −/− mouse model

Defining the temporal evolution of gut dysbiosis and inflammatory responses leading to hepatocellular carcinoma in Mdr2 −/− mouse model.

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Item Type: Article
Status: Published
Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12866-021-02171-9
Journal or Publication Title: BMC Microbiology
Volume: 21
Number: 1
Date: 2021
Divisions: Liver Injury and Cancer
Depositing User: General Admin
Identification Number: 10.1186/s12866-021-02171-9
ISSN: 1471-2180
Date Deposited: 10 Jun 2021 01:03
Abstract:

Background: Emerging evidence implicates the gut microbiome in liver inflammation and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development. We aimed to characterize the temporal evolution of gut dysbiosis, in relation to the phenotype of systemic and hepatic inflammatory responses leading to HCC development. In the present study, Mdr2 -/- mice were used as a model of inflammation-based HCC. Gut microbiome composition and function, in addition to serum LPS, serum cytokines/chemokines and intrahepatic inflammatory genes were measured throughout the course of liver injury until HCC development.

Results: Early stages of liver injury, inflammation and cirrhosis, were characterized by dysbiosis. Microbiome functional pathways pertaining to gut barrier dysfunction were enriched during the initial phase of liver inflammation and cirrhosis, whilst those supporting lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis increased as cirrhosis and HCC ensued. In parallel, serum LPS progressively increased during the course of liver injury, corresponding to a shift towards a systemic Th1/Th17 proinflammatory phenotype. Alongside, the intrahepatic inflammatory gene profile transitioned from a proinflammatory phenotype in the initial phases of liver injury to an immunosuppressed one in HCC. In established HCC, a switch in microbiome function from carbohydrate to amino acid metabolism occurred.

Conclusion: In Mdr2 -/- mice, dysbiosis precedes HCC development, with temporal evolution of microbiome function to support gut barrier dysfunction, LPS biosynthesis, and redirection of energy source utilization. A corresponding shift in systemic and intrahepatic inflammatory responses occurred supporting HCC development. These findings support the notion that gut based therapeutic interventions could be beneficial early in the course of liver disease to halt HCC development.

Creators:
Creators
Email
Behary, J.
UNSPECIFIED
Raposo, A. E.
UNSPECIFIED
Amorim, N. M. L.
UNSPECIFIED
Zheng, H.
UNSPECIFIED
Gong, L.
UNSPECIFIED
McGovern, E.
UNSPECIFIED
Chen, J.
UNSPECIFIED
Liu, K.
UNSPECIFIED
Beretov, J.
UNSPECIFIED
Theocharous, C.
UNSPECIFIED
Jackson, M. T.
UNSPECIFIED
Seet-Lee, J.
UNSPECIFIED
McCaughan, G. W.
UNSPECIFIED
El-Omar, E. M.
UNSPECIFIED
Zekry, A.
UNSPECIFIED
Last Modified: 10 Jun 2021 01:03
URI: https://eprints.centenary.org.au/id/eprint/988

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